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This abandoned coal-burning powerplant will be transformed from a symbol of today’s problems to a monument of collaboration and acceleration toward an abundant, regenerative future and fuel today’s clean economy.

From Coal to Clean

Once used to burn coal to electrify Grand Central Station, The Plant will, one day soon, become the epicenter of a positive global transformation – to combat the climate crisis and its ripple effect on the planet.

The Plant represents the first 100 years of industrialization. Built in 1907 to electrify Grand Central Station, The Plant housed cutting edge technologies and served as a symbol of American innovation, engineering, and architectural achievement. Yet, it is also a symbol of an era of resource extraction, combustion, and pollution – a paradigm we must abandon if we are to preserve the planet for future generations.

For the next 100 years, The Plant will become a global home for those working to solve humanity’s most pressing problem – climate change.

Climate is the number one existential threat facing humanity. It’s time to step up to the challenge of repairing the vandalization of the industrial revolution and the 20th century.



STORY   PHOTOS   CONTACT
The Story
of The Plant

The PowerHouse stands on 6000 piles over the Hudson River with unparalleled views of the New York City skyline and the Palisades. Built in 1907, it will be converted into monumental and intimate spaces for exhibitions, events, conferences and performances, transforming an abandoned icon of the industrial era into an inspiring cultural and social destination.

The plant was designed by Charles Reed and Alan Stem, renowned civic architects and co-architects of Grand Central Station in New York City. The Romanesque-Revival style, multi-building complex features distinct architectural expression, reinforced by the massing, materials and articulation of the facade. The PowerHouse is a superb example of the industrial architecture of the period. It is one of the only remaining power plants constructed for the electrification of the New York Central Railroad, and has been abandoned since the 1970s.

The PowerHouse will transform the Yonkers waterfront into an inspiring destination at the crossroads of history, nature and culture. A fusion of 21st-century design approach and restoration methods will preserve the property’s architecture, interiors, landscape and historical legacy.

DEVELOPMENT OF THE PLANT

The historic redevelopment will be a waterfront revitalization project preserving and reinforcing the landmark features of the property. Our approach to site planning, engineering, and architecture will be to incorporate the most cutting-edge practices and technologies exhibiting the most impactful climate solutions. The development goals include:
  • Create a regionally significant cultural/social anchor to stimulate unmet economic demand in the Yonkers and the New York Metropolitan Area
  • Provide waterfront access through exterior public plazas, a Hudson River platform for pedestrian circulation, enhanced parkland and a marina—all majestically overlooking the Hudson River and the forested cliffs of the New Jersey Palisades Park, a protected National Historic Landmark
  • Create state-of-the-art, flexible event spaces that meet the demands of a changing market and offer cutting-edge technology, production and communications solutions
  • Engage and enrich the local and regional communities through the historical importance, cultural exchange and creative energy that The PowerHouse will invigorate
  • Preserve, restore and celebrate the historical significance of the former Glenwood Power Plant
  • Capitalize on the public financing options available for historic preservation and economic development
  • Create a unique architectural fusion of historic preservation and sustainable design
  • Maintain the architectural integrity of the building with the use of sustainable practices, energy-efficient devices, materials, design strategies, solar and green generation including compliance with LEED certification
HISTORY

The Glenwood Power Plant (also known as the Yonkers Power Plant) in Yonkers, built between 1904 and 1906, is one of two power stations constructed for the electrification of the New York Central Railroad from Grand Central Terminal to the northern suburbs of New York City. As an integral part of the monumental civic vision of Grand Central Terminal—which included electrification of the line, construction of the new terminal building, the re-establishment of Park Avenue and the cross streets by depressing the tracks below street level, and the development of an entire district of new real estate—the Glenwood Power Plant is of significant historical value.

The power station was designed by the architecture firm of Charles Reed & Alan Stem who, in association with the firm Warren & Wetmore, also designed Grand Central Terminal. Specialists in the design of railroad buildings, Reed & Stem designed both the Glenwood and the Port Morris Power Stations, the associated substations and various local stations on the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad lines.

The Glenwood Power Plant is an outstanding example of early 20th-century engineering and is the last remaining and intact power station constructed for the electrification of the Grand Central railroad. Its monumental scale and Romanesque-Revival style architecture are fine examples of the industrial architecture of the period. The New York Central Railroad owned and operated the power station between 1907-1936, when it served the sole function of powering the railroad.

Timeline

Historic Restoration and Redevelopment Video

THE PLANT IN PHOTOS

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WE ARE CATALYSTS AND BUILDERS, IN EQUAL MEASURE